Translate

Blog Archive

Tuesday, October 17, 2017

How Do You Get A Japanese Boyfriend?

Last week, I wrote about how to get a Japanese girlfriend. Despite me being bad with girls and can't get a girlfriend to save my f***ing life, I told them respect, comedy, trust, connection, and standing out from the average will definitely land you a girlfriend, especially a Japanese girlfriend.

Now my lady friend told me It's really hard trying to get a Japanese boyfriend. I get nervous whenever I get close to him. What should I do? 

Again with the romance thing...I love my friends but don't they know I suck at romance?

Now, I do understand that it's really stressful and vigilant about the person that we like romantically. Been there, done that.

However, hearing that a woman being scared about talking to a guy that they're really interested in, it's really surprising.

The reason why it's surprising is that I mainly hear that guys would get that problem almost 100% of the time. They see a beautiful girl, their heart skips beating, the body being shaky and heating up, and their "man thing" slightly gets bigger. And vice versa

I've almost never heard a woman scared or nervous of talking to a guy they really like.

In all honesty, women shouldn't be scared of talking to guys because they have really big advantages when they deal with guys romantically.

Women rarely get shot down, politely getting rejected, they can say whatever they want to him and nothing bad's going to happen, blah blah blah... So, hearing that they need help with that made my head scratch.

I remembered that a comedian named Mark Normand told the audience that women can say whatever they want in the dating world. For example, an older lady (50s) told me that I'm so cute and adorable that she would kidnap me. While I was flattered, I think about it for a short time and realized...I can never say that to any woman. If I did, she'll be offended, someone will call the cops, I'll get arrested, sent to jail, and probably be prisoned raped, etc.

Moral of the story: Ladies, take the risk and approach the guy. It would surprise him, but at least trying something out of norm would help each other out!

Start approaching,
Jay Nakamura

Monday, October 9, 2017

How Do You Get A Japanese Girlfriend?

During my usual schedule of schooling, babysitting, and basically doing nothing for my time in the fall, a couple of people asked me on social media Jay, can you tell me how do you get a Japanese girlfriend? 

In all honesty, I literally laughed my lungs out. It's not a disrespectful thing because there are a lot of people that are asking the same thing, it's mainly they're asking the wrong person. They LITERALLY asked the wrong person.

Out of all the questions that people can ask me, questions about getting a girlfriend, especially a Japanese girlfriend, is basically the hardest I've ever tried to answer. It made even rocket science a lot easier to understand. 

The reason is basically simple. I suck at girls, no matter what's their nationality is. My dad's still a ladies man, and he's about to be 75 in a couple of years.

I became honest to them and told them that I am literally the wrong person I asked them. However, I did tell them some good advice.

The best way is to be confident and humble at the same time. For example, when a girl tolds you that you are very smart, your ideal phrase is "I am really intelligent but I do need to improve a lot to become wiser." Not too arrogant and not too wimpy. Confident and humble at the same time.

Also, be friends with the girl first. It's a corny advice but it still works. There are loads of times that friends become couples. So it doesn't really hurt to be friends with her. Being a friend means showing respect and making sure that she's comfortable.

Finally, just be yourself. Again, corny advice but still works. A girl will remember someone by how they stand out against the average. So, don't get scared of doing some different, as long as it's appropriate, comfortable, and legal.

Good luck,
Jay Nakamura

Thursday, October 5, 2017

Strict gun laws == few shooting deaths

Yesterday, I read the news (like any other human being) and saw a huge shooting spree in Las Vegas, Nevada. About 60 people died and more than 500 people are injured. Now, the Las Vegas mass shooting marks the deadliest shooting in modern American history, beating the shooting at an Orlando nightclub in 2014.

While people believed that it's a national news, people in other countries around the world, especially in Japan, heard the news.

The common thing that people heard about Japan's "shockingly" statistics about their low crime rate is that an average Japanese civilian cannot possess and sell any kinds of national and international guns inside of the country. Not only possessing, but carrying, buying, and selling handguns and rifles.

While that sounds great, there are people that are the exception to the law. Hunters can have only shotguns for gaming but they need to have a hunting license. In order to get the hunting license, prospective hunters need to have a clean screening of no problems with mental and behavioral problems. Plus, hunting license needs to be renewed every three years.

The second group of people that are the exception to the gun laws is obviously the police officers. While it wasn't really shocking that police officers are being exempted from the law, they rarely use the guns. It's more of a last-case scenario for the police.

Finally, the yakuza might be exempted from the law. The reason...I have no idea, but mostly it deals with the escalation of violence between rival groups. In 2016, 27 incidents dealing with guns are recorded from mostly Yakuza violence.

For the Japanese people and the majority of Asian countries, mass shootings are caused mostly by the guns itself, giving someone that unknown power to end someone's life in an instant. However, in Western countries, people explained that its the person itself to have the power to end it, and not the gun. It's the person's mentality...

What do you think: is it the gun that has the major fault or the person's mental state?

Stay safe,
Jay Nakamura 

Strict gun laws mean Japan sees fewer shooting deaths | The Japan Times

Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Peppa Pig Is Coming to Japan

Kids program from Western countries does make their marks in Japan, but this one is a prime example of it.

Peppa Pig, a kids program that started in the United Kingdom, is heading to Japan. The kids' program is going to be aired on the free-to-air broadcaster TV TOKYO. The first episode of Peppa Pig will be held on October 10th.

Peppa Pig tells the stories of a UK English pig named Peppa that tells the story of her family and her daily life.

The surprising part of it was that Peppa Pig is already a big hit in Asian countries.

The biggest reason for Peppa Pig's arrival in Japan is that UK English continues to rise in Japanese younger generation. While in Japan, American English is used a lot more than UK English, and Peppa Pig would make the competition of English language be interesting.

While I've heard about the show when it reached American soil, I haven't really watched it because UK English is really confusing for me to understand.

Anyway, hope it would be a big hit in Japan.

Good luck,
Jay Nakamura

http://variety.com/2017/tv/news/peppa-pig-heading-to-japan-1202570255/


*I would like to apologize again for my long-term absence. School and babysitting has been really hard on me, so I'll do my best to post more often!

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Jay Japanese in Yahoo! Japan

I've been thinking about this the whole time, and some people in Japan explained it to me. They're mostly saying Your blog is great but it's really hard for me to understand English. I was really concerned about it for some time because they are grateful for reading my blog, but since their English is really limited, they cannot understand it perfectly.

So, for them, I created the Japanese version of it so that people in Japan would understand the posts a lot better! It's going to be really challenging for me to translate all my popular posts and future posts from English to Japanese, but I am willing to do it for the people!

So here's the link toward the blog in Yahoo! Japan: http://blogs.yahoo.co.jp/nakamurajay59

Have fun, 
Jay Nakamura

Thursday, September 14, 2017

What's it like learning Japanese

I get this question sometimes when I tell people that I am learning Japanese. A lot of people in Louisiana was surprised that I am learning Japanese since Louisiana has no big correlation to Japanese culture whatsoever. The biggest Asian culture in Louisiana is Vietnamese and learning even a little of it was extremely hard. The reason is that I could find anything that can help me improve my learning with Vietnamese culture. The language was hard, the food was good but tough to chew, and the music was so confusing. So, I gave up juggling Japanese and Vietnamese, and just keep going with Japanese culture because that's the one culture outside of America that I know a lot and is excited to learn more about it.

(Sorry...off subject a little...)

With the question "What's it like learning Japanese," I gave simple answers such as It's really good or I really love it. Just without much explanation...

To me, learning Japanese is the same thing as practicing soccer: extremely excited about the basics, improving myself on my strengths and weaknesses, learn from people that have the same culture, and just keep learning from it.

Japanese has been a great information that I took into my life because it teaches me many things inside their culture that I can use for daily life, such as expressing myself the right way, always lend out a helping hand, and to be nice and respectful to everyone. 

While I am really excited about learning it, juggling school, work, soccer practice, and other things made it really hard for me to learn the Japanese language. While I kept trying to rearrange my schedule, many events popped up out of nowhere, so it was really hard to balance my Japanese studies out.

While I do admit that there are many things that about Japanese culture that I either need to improve on or haven't learned, I am willing to learn as much as I can until my last day on Earth.

Doing my best,
Jay Nakamura

Tuesday, September 12, 2017

Shintoism, Japan's Official Religion Pt.1

Shinto is Japanese's official religion. As of 2017, about 52 percent of Japanese people's religion is Shinto. Anime and Japanese dramas have shown many rituals of Shinto from time to time that could make a small opening into what the religion actually looks like. While it is really great for them to show something that deals with the Japanese religion, many people don't really know the facts and how Shinto really works. So today, I am going to show you the facts about Shinto and how the religion works for the Japanese people.

1. Shinto is Polytheistic

Unlike Christianity where it only has one god, Shinto has many gods. While Christainity's god is just mainly God himself, Shinto gods are mainly gods that come from all of your surroundings. Such as your ancestors, gods from your region, people that died a tragic death or trying to change the world, ancient gods, or even nature itself. That's why in some anime shows that characters tend to talk to their family members or friends that died. So that's why there are about 8 million gods!! Shinto has so many gods that the Japanese made a phrase Yaoyorozu no Kami which means 8 million gods.

So no, those anime characters are not crazy at all!


2. Humans becoming Gods

Yes, normal human beings can become gods in Shinto. The only way that a human becomes a god is they are revered after their deaths if they lived a great or pure life. While God in Christianity believed to be perfect, Shinto gods are not perfect since they have emotions like normal human beings.



3. Unknown founder of Shintoism

Christians would always think that Jesus Christ is the founder of Christianity, while Japanese people won't know about their founder of Shinto. When the Japanese people and the culture became aware of the religion, it had already been there. The earliest and closest resemblance of Shinto in early history was Yayoi culture between the 3rd and 2nd century BC. The Yayoi phenomena were agricultural rites and shamanism. 


4. Purity

Shinto's main tenets deal with purity of the mind, body, and soul. It's easily observable in daily Japanese life, from removing shoes at the door to the sick receiving organs from dead organ donors. Purification rituals were developed to cleanse the body and spirit. The most common are temizu, the washing of hands and face to achieve purification before approaching to any Shinto shrines.


5. New Year's Day

Shinto's important holiday is New Year's Day. On New Year's Eve, Buddhist temple rings its bells 108 times until exactly midnight. The reason for 108 times is that one ring correlates to one sin. Then, for the first three days of the new year, people gather together to celebrate the new year by eating, drinking, and being together. 

The most important thing is to visit any of the shrines to pray for good luck and buy charms for the new years. 


That's the end of part one, and I'll start on part two soon!!

Happy Shinto,

Monday, September 11, 2017

Japan and September 11th

In America, September 11th was the day that changed the country forever because of the highjacking of four airplanes that crashed into the World Trade Center in New York City, part of the Pentagon, and a park at Pennsylvania. While being named the world's worst act of terrorism since December 7th, 1941 when Imperial Japan attacked Pearl Harbor, not many people would know these kinds of facts about 9/11.

While it is of course that about 3,000 people in total had died from the terrorist attack, about 24 of the 3,000 were actually Japanese!! Yeah...I was surprised as well. Japanese casualties from the attack were the 6th-most casualties when it comes to international citizens that died in the attack.

In 2014, Taichi Sugiyama read aloud the names of the 24 Japanese victims at the annual memorial ceremony, including his father. Taichi was 3 years old at the time of his father's shocking death, and he was 16 years old when he said the names at New York City.

Taichi explained that even terrorists have their own perspectives, and we need to try to understand their situation so the fighting will finally end.

Like Taichi, people from around the world are doing the best they can so they'll never have another 9/11 at anywhere in the world.

I would just say that I am deeply sorry for everyone that has suffered from the terrorist attacks in any way, and I do try my very best that world peace will be attainable in the future!!

Love and peace,
Jay Nakamura



https://www.japantimes.co.jp/news/2014/09/12/national/son-japanese-911-victim-asks-world-never-forget/#.WbdEzsh97IU

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casualties_of_the_September_11_attacks

Thursday, September 7, 2017

Sexual Assault in Japan

OK....

Now I love Japan with all of my heart, but when it comes to this,...Japan, what the f*** is going on?

While Japan  has been one of the safest countries in the world with little crime, crime against Japanese and/or foreign women are REALLY common. It doesn't make any sense whatsoever that the society is still having this problem.

And that problem is sexual assault. 

Sexual assault has been one of the most common crimes that happened in Japan. It became really bad that train stations has a women-only car. Japan...if you created a women-only train car, it's probably a sign that this crime is out of control. 

There were countless times that Japanese women has been groped in trains, have their undies and/or bras taken discreetly, or unwanted sexual advantages on almost a daily basis. It's not just the Japanese males that done those types of crimes, but foreign males as well. The sickening part was that almost no one intervenes because it's a "private matter" between two people. 

 I do admit that there are times that Japanese women do fight back either physically or verbally, but there are some that are too shy to do anything because they're in shock that a male intentionally violated them. 

While the Japanese law enforcement and the government tried a lot of ways to lower sexual assault, there are some successes but overall not really much changed...

While I do strongly suggest women to speak up and to tell the cops immediately, the cops...really made the situation f***** up. When a Japanese woman actually have a chance to speak up to the police about their assault, majority of the times...they brush it off. 

While I thought that was bad, it became worse. When there's an actual time that the suspect gets convicted for sexual assault, they just apologize, pay the fine, and they're good to go.

Now...let that sink in. In Japan, the suspect could get away with the crime with the woman is scared for the rest of her life. Also, when a sexual assault happens, almost no one intervenes because it's disrespectful to get into someone's business.

For my Japanese brothers and sisters, it's COMPLETELY different in the United States. Sexual assault is really looked down. In America, people intervene, majority of the women would fight back, and the suspect will get arrested and put in jail. In American jail, perverts like that are the lowest of the low. Even lower than murderers...

I had met some Japanese women that was assaulted sometime in their lives, and I was really saddened about their experiences.

However, my best friend was sexually assaulted by an American foreigner. I was saddened because when she called me, her voice trembled. I had mixed emotions about that incident. I was sad because my best friend got violated by someone and upset to the guy that hurts the person that I know and love. 

Now...I am a forgiving person. I do forgive people from their mistakes.

My friend forgot to text back...didn't really bothered me that much.
Someone ate my chocolate chip cookies...I'll just buy another one.
My baby cousin puked on my Real Madrid jersey...I'll laugh about it even though it was a Ronaldo jersey and it cost me about $100. 

However,...this is one of those few times that I would NEVER forgive someone. I don't care if you buy me lunch, given me thousands of dollars, or other things, you hurt someone that I know and love. That's automatically unforgivable to me.

I am sorry but the day that someone hurts the people that I know and love is the day that I bash their skill and spit on their grave. I don't care if it was too far for me to do that, but they shouldn't have the right to hurt someone for any reason whatsoever.

Everyone please be careful,
Jay Nakamura

Monday, September 4, 2017

Australian Man Blames Japanese Women on His Passion of Japan

In a Japan Times article, an Australian named Damien blamed Japanese women for him being bored in Japan. He said that by having a Japanese girlfriend, he would get bored with learning anything about Japanese culture.

How a love of Japan led me to stop dating its women | The Japan Times

The one (and only) positive thing that I could give to Damien is that he had a lot of balls telling people about his problem with Japanese women interfering with his passion with Japan altogether. I completely respect people by telling what's in the heart and/or mind. However,...bravery doesn't always cover up this kind of stupidity. Not just stupidity, but immature and messed up at the same time.

Blaming Japanese women for interfering with your passion does not make sense whatsoever. Damien saying is that the more time you put up with Japanese women, the less enjoyable Japan is altogether. He believes that since he thinks like a Japanese person, then he can't date Japanese women, which does not make sense. No matter how much you know about Japanese culture, it's impossible to be pure Japanese.

Having a Japanese girlfriend shouldn't correlate with having fun in Japan. I'll admit. I never had a girlfriend, let alone a Japanese girlfriend. If I do someday, I would never blame them for me being bored with studying Japanese. There are lots of stuff that I can do to learn and to have fun. And plus...it's Japan...Boring cannot be the vocabulary when describing Japan.

Plus, Damien explained how many Asian girls he slept on his journey. He slept with Koreans, Filipino, Chinese, Thai, Nepalese...just one-third of the continent. While I do strongly support interracial dating and marriage, there are times that people make it an arrogant thing. It's not just a man-whore thing, but a foreigner "Casanova" thing.

For those that don't know what a casanova is, a casanova is a male that is smooth-talking women into sleeping with him. I am not trying to be a white knight or anything, but casanova men would make women feared of being in a relationship because they played with their hearts and they don't want to be played again.

I still don't get why foreign men tend to call themselves casanova men in Asia. It really doesn't make sense. You just go to Japan (or any other Asian country) and you're a shoo-in. You don't have to do anything besides being a decent human being. It makes the foreigners there give a bad reputation.

When I have a son, I'll teach him to treat girls as human beings, not as trophies for your penis.

In conclusion, Damien...even though I congratulate you with your bravery to speak your mind, this is one of those times that silence actually wins.

Be respectful,
Jay Nakamura